Voici les éléments 1 - 10 sur 17
  • Publication
    Accès libre
    Collaborative hunting in the yellow saddle goatfish (Parupeneus cyclostomus)
    Cooperation is of great interdisciplinary interest because we need to reconcile its occurrence with evolutionary theory and its emphasis on self-regarding individuals. Group hunting in various vertebrates has attracted much and continued attention from researchers because it provides the opportunity to study the evolution and stability of cooperation, the potential links between cooperation and cognitive abilities. Until now, all studies on coordinated hunting have been field observations and are hence correlative. Therefore, many conclusions are rather preliminary, like the repeatedly observed positive correlation between group size and hunting success as evidence for cooperation. In my PhD-thesis I conducted an unprecedented experimental study using yellow saddle goatfish (Parupeneus cyclostomus) as a study species. Yellow saddle goatfish are the first fish species described to be collaborative hunters. Individuals play different roles during a hunt (‘chasers’ and ‘blockers’), encircling prey hiding in coral crevices and trying to pry it out with means of inserting their barbels. I designed an experimental set-up in which the yellow saddle goatfish were confronted with a) mock prey that was pulled towards a shelter with multiple entrances; b) lively mobile prey hiding in an artificial coral reef. Cameras which were installed above and below allowed me to conduct detailed behavioural analyses i) to find out which decision rules underlie collaborative hunting in the yellow saddle goatfish; ii) to test the relationship between group size and hunting success; iii) to find out which payoff matrix conforms best to the hunting scenario when yellow saddle goatfish try to pry out the prey hidden in the shelter. The findings of my first chapter demonstrate that collaborative hunting in yellow saddle goatfish is based on simple, distance-based, self-serving decision rules. The individual that first detected the moving mock-prey always initiated a direct pursuit. Similarly, goatfish that were second to react in our experiments directly pursued the prey in almost all trials when they were in close proximity to the initiator. However, when lagging behind the initiator, the follower opted for a longer, less direct path to the prey. In the second chapter I showed that overall hunting efficiency (probability and speed of catching prey) is a function of group size. Larger groups of yellow saddle goatfish performed better and generally caught prey faster than smaller groups did. Groups of all sizes (2-4 individuals) were significantly more successful and faster than singleton hunters. Furthermore, I demonstrated that efficiency as singleton hunters did not predict hunting success when in a group. However, with my experimental set-up I could not address the question of how net calorie intake is affected by group size, as singleton success rate was already much higher than success rates observed in nature. The findings of my third chapter, where I investigated on how yellow saddle goatfish behave in order to pry out the hidden prey from the coral rock, demonstrate that actions were mainly maintained in order to obtain immediate benefits. Only the first barbel insertion decreased immediate benefits to the actor and created a public good resulting in payoff matrices similar to Snowdrift (2 players) and Volunteer’s Dilemma (N-players) games. However, further insertion effort did not lower capture probability, which even increased for the individuals that touched the prey first. Hence, besides being the first to insert, barbel-insertion can be considered as self-serving. Barbel insertion effort decreased from the singleton to the group hunting level and remained constant from 2-player to N-player situations, a finding which stands in contrast to theoretical predictions. These would expect a decline in the described situations, however under the assumption that the entire game is a Snowdrift/Volunteer’s Dilemma game. Interestingly, I could not find a correlation between insertion effort from singleton to group hunts, meaning that individuals seem to adjust their behaviour independently from whether they hunt alone or with others. In conclusion, the results of my PhD-thesis show that yellow saddle goatfish predominantly hunt self-servingly by following strategies which underlie simple decision rules. Overall, I propose that seemingly complex cooperation / collaboration can be based on simple rules. The challenge for researchers studying large-brained species is hence to test whether larger brains lead to more complex decision rules or whether collaborative hunting is generally a rather simple story.
  • Publication
    Accès libre
    Endogenous oxytocin predicts helping and conversation as a function of group membership.
    (2018-07-04T00:00:00Z)
    McClung, Jennifer Susan
    ;
    ; ; ;
    Humans cooperate with unrelated individuals to an extent that far outstrips any other species. We also display extreme variation in decisions about whether to cooperate or not, and the mechanisms driving this variation remain an open question across the behavioural sciences. One candidate mechanism underlying this variation in cooperation is the evolutionary ancient neurohormone oxytocin (OT). As current research focuses on artificial administration of OT in asocial tasks, little is known about how the hormone in its naturally occurring state actually impacts behaviour in social interactions. Using a new optimal foraging paradigm, the 'egg hunt', we assessed the association of endogenous OT with helping behaviour and conversation. We manipulated players' group membership relative to each other prior to an egg hunt, during which they had repeated opportunities to spontaneously help each other. Results show that endogenous baseline OT predicted helping and conversation type, but crucially as a function of group membership. Higher baseline OT predicted increased helping but only between in-group players, as well as decreased discussion about individuals' goals between in-group players but conversely more of such discussion between out-group players. Subsequently, behaviour but not conversation during the hunt predicted change in OT, in that out-group members who did not help showed a decrease in OT from baseline levels. In sum, endogenous OT predicts helping behaviour and conversation, importantly as a function of group membership, and this effect occurs in parallel to uniquely human cognitive processes.
  • Publication
    Accès libre
    Partner control mechanisms in repeated social interactions
    (2017)
    Wubs, Matthias
    ;
    ;
    Lehmann, Laurent
    Les individus qui interagissent socialement doivent souvent décider entre aider leur prochain, en leur procurant un bénéfice a un possible cout, ou pas. Tandis qu'une paire d'individus s'en sort mieux si les deux s'entraident, un individu peut tirer un bénéfice relatif s'il se décide à ne pas aider tandis que l'autre l'aide. Cette situation crée un dilemme social. Parce que les interactions sociales sont souvent répétées, les individus peuvent conditionner leurs propres actions sur les actions de leur partenaire lors d'interactions passées. Il existe trois mécanismes de contrôle de partenaire qui stabilisent la coopération lors d'interactions répétées entre paires d'individus: la réciprocité positive (la décision d'aider est conditionnée sur l'aide du partenaire lors de l'interaction précédente), la punition, et le changement de partenaire. Mais les conditions sous lesquelles un mécanisme domine sur les autres lorsque les trois mécanismes coévoluent dans une même population sont mal comprises.
    Un autre point qu'il est important de considérer pour comprendre les interactions sociales est que le comportement exprimé peut aussi dépendre sur l'environnement. Il est probable que le toilettage social chez les primates, par exemple, dépend de la compétition sur les ressources de nourriture. Si la nourriture est concentrée dans l'espace et facilement monopolisée, les individus en haut de la hiérarchie sociale peuvent défendre ces ressources, auquel cas les individus en bas de la hiérarchie doivent les toiletter afin d'être tolérer sur leur territoire et accéder à leur ressource. Afin de comprendre ce comportement, il est nécessaire de comprendre les conditions sous lesquelles le toilettage est échangé contre du toilettage, ou contre la tolérance sur un territoire.
    Dans cette thèse, je développe et utilise des modèles agents basés pour explorer la coévolution des mécanismes de contrôle de partenaire et l'évolution de patrons de toilettage chez les primates.
    Dans le premier chapitre, je démontre que dans une population panmictique, plus les interactions sont répétées, plus il est probable que le changement de partenaire soit le mécanisme de contrôle de partenaire dominant. Si les interactions sont restreintes au sein de petits groupes de non-apparentés, alors la punition est le mécanisme le plus probablement favorisé par la sélection. Les conditions pour que la réciprocité positive soit dominante sont moins clairement définies.
    Dans le deuxième chapitre, j'étudie comment la dispersion limitée chez la progéniture, le recouvrement de génération, et le cout de la complexité influencent la compétitivité de chaque mécanisme de contrôle. Il est démontré que la compétitivité du changement de partenaire est accrue par le recouvrement de génération tandis que celle de la punition est très diminuée par le cout de complexité. De plus, alors que les conditions pour que ces mécanismes de contrôle de partenaire soient dominants s'élargissent avec la structure d'apparentement, les conditions pour que l'aide inconditionnelle domine sur l'aide conditionnelle se restreignent.
    Dans le troisième chapitre, je développe un modèle d'apprentissage par renforcement pour simuler les interactions de toilettage et l'accès a la nourriture chez les primates. On observe des patrons de toilettage réciproque lorsqu'il n'y pas de compétition pour les ressources, et des patrons de toilettage dirigé vers le haut de l'échelle hiérarchique lorsque la compétition pour les ressources augmente. Il est montré que l'effort dans le toilettage n'augmente pas forcément avec la compétition pour les ressources, et qu'une augmentation d'agressivité amène le toilettage à être plus réciproque.
    En bref, les comportements sociaux d'entraide dans les milieux naturels sont observés dans une multitude d'interactions sociales répétées. En explorant une gamme variée de conditions, les modèles développés dans cette thèse permettent de mieux comprendre quels mécanismes de contrôle de partenaire sont favorisés par la sélection naturelle. De plus, le modèle du troisième chapitre montre que les patrons de toilettage dépendent de plusieurs paramètres naturels importants., Individuals that interact socially regularly have to make decisions whether to help another individual (provide some payoff benefit, possible at a personal payoff cost) or not. Here, a pair of individuals is best off if both individuals help each other, but a single individual may gain a relative payoff advantage by not helping (defecting) while the partner does choose to help, thus creating a dilemma. Because social interactions are often repeated, individuals can condition the actions they take on the actions taken by their partner in previous rounds of interaction. The so-called partner control mechanisms positive reciprocity (where acts of helping are conditioned on receiving help from the partner), punishment, and partner switching have all been shown to stabilize cooperation in populations where the individuals engage in repeated pairwise interactions. What remains unclear, however, is under which conditions each partner control mechanism will be dominant in a population if the the partner control mechanisms coevolve.
    Additionally, the expressed behaviour in repeated social interactions may depend on the state of the environment in which the interactions take place. Social grooming in primates is likely to depend on the food competition that the individuals experience. If food is clustered and monopolizable, high ranked individuals may defend food sources, where low ranked individuals then need to groom high ranked ones in order to be tolerated on the food source, resulting in grooming being directed up the hierarchy. However, the conditions that cause grooming to be traded for grooming or grooming to be traded for tolerance have yet to be quantified.
    In this thesis, I developed several agent-based models in order to investigate both the coevolution of various partner control mechanisms and the grooming patterns in primates.
    In chapter one, I demonstrated that in a well-mixed population the likelihood of partner switching being the dominant partner control mechanism increases with increasing number of rounds of interaction. Furthermore, if interactions are localized to small groups of unrelated individuals, then punishment is more likely to be favoured by selection compared to the well-mixed case, while the conditions where positive reciprocity is dominant are less clearly defined.
    In chapter two, I investigated how limited migration of offspring, overlapping generations, and complexity costs affect the competitiveness of each partner control mechanism. It is shown that the relative competitiveness of partner switching is increased due to generational overlap, while punishment is most strongly negatively affected by complexity costs. Additionally, while the conditions where these partner control mechanisms are dominant in the population increases if the population is kin structured, the conditions where unconditional helping is dominant over conditional helping strategies are rather stringent.
    In chapter three, I developed a reinforcement learning model that simulated grooming and feeding interactions in primates. The model generated patterns of grooming reciprocity in the absence of food competition, while grooming was found to be directed up the hierarchy if individuals compete for food. It is shown that grooming up the hierarchy may not necessarily increase with increasing food competition, and that an increase in aggressiveness causes grooming to become more reciprocal.
    In summary, helping behaviours occur in a diversity of repeated social interactions in natural populations. By exploring a large range of conditions, the models developed in this thesis provide insights regarding which partner control mechanism is likely to be dominant in a population. In addition, the model from chapter three shows how grooming patterns may depend on a variety of relevant parameters.
  • Publication
    Accès libre
    The ecology underlying decision rules of bluestreak cleaner wrasse during client interactions
    (2017)
    McAfoose, Sharon
    ;
    La coopération est définie comme un «comportement d'aide» qui offre des avantages directs à d'autres individus. Un tel comportement a longtemps intrigué les biologistes car il pose un problème pour la théorie évolutive classique : pourquoi un individu devrait-il effectuer un comportement qui bénéficie un autre individu plutôt que lui-même? En effet, un vaste ensemble de travaux sur la théorie des jeux évolutifs ainsi que des études empiriques ont depuis identifié de nombreux mécanismes qui expliquent le maintien d’une coopération stable entre des individus non apparentés. Cependant, le comportement humain ne correspond souvent pas aux stratégies optimales prédites par les modèles théoriques, d’où la nécessité de comprendre les processus de prises de décisions. Par exemple, l'utilisation de raccourcis de décision, correspondant à une heuristique connue (ou d'une règle empirique dans le cas des animaux non-humains), permet aux individus de prendre des décisions rapides et précises dans des situations auxquels ils sont fréquemment confrontés. Par contre, ces raccourcis peuvent conduire à des comportements sub-optimaux dans des contextes nouveaux. Les contraintes cognitives, telles que les capacités d'apprentissage ou l'incapacité à identifier les indices environnementaux ou sociaux pertinents, peuvent également entraîner des différences par rapport au comportement prédit.
    En étudiant le labre nettoyeur (Labroides dimidiatus) comme modèle, cette thèse avait pour objectifs : 1) d'étudier les importantes disparités entre les données expérimentales et les prévisions théoriques standard concernant les décisions animales lors d’interactions coopératives; et 2) d’explorer la façon dont les nettoyeurs sont en mesure de facilement identifier et utiliser des repères pertinents pour la prise de décision. Les nettoyeurs participent à des interactions mutualistes avec des poissons de récifs coralliens appelés «clients» qui viennent les visiter dans leur territoire afin de se faire déparasiter. Cependant les nettoyeurs préfèrent se comporter en parasites et tricher en se nourrissant du mucus des clients qui est riche en azote plutôt que de leurs parasites. Par conséquent, pour encourager les nettoyeurs à être coopératifs, les clients utilisent divers mécanismes de contrôle tels que la punition et le changement de partenaire. Ce mutualisme entre nettoyeurs et clients a jusqu'ici fourni de solides preuves empiriques soutenant l’usage de la théorie des jeux évolutifs pour prédire le comportement coopératif.
    Dans le chapitre 2, je démontre que les nettoyeurs qui proviennent de récifs caractérisés par une structure sociale complexe surpassent largement les nettoyeurs provenant de récifs caractérisés par une structure sociale simple lors d’expériences classiques de coopération et de cognition. Les récifs « simples » sont caractérisés par une abondance et une diversité de clients moindre ainsi qu'une plus faible densité de nettoyeurs par rapport aux récifs « complexes ». Mes expériences démontrent que les nettoyeurs provenant d’environnements simples ne réussissent généralement pas à: 1) se nourrir contre leur préférence, 2) adapter leur comportement coopératif en présence d'un observateur et 3) offrir systématiquement la priorité à une source de nourriture temporaire plutôt qu’à une source de nourriture permanente. Ces résultats contrastent fortement avec les données publiées sur des comportements de recherche de nourriture dans des expériences en laboratoire traditionnelles. Pour mieux comprendre ces disparités, j'ai étudié dans le chapitre 3 si les deux groupes de nettoyeurs utilisent des indices différents lors de la prise de décisions au moment où ils vont se nourrir, particulièrement en ce qui concerne la priorité offerte aux clients. Les nettoyeurs provenant d'environnements socialement complexes sont capables de trouver un repère précis lors de la prise de décision, conduisant à une plus grande précision dans les tâches en laboratoire. Par contre, les nettoyeurs provenant d'environnements socialement simples utilisent une règle de base qui conduit à une performance plus faible lors de la même tâche.
    Dans le chapitre 4, j'ai déterminé que les règles appliquées par les deux groupes de nettoyeurs en milieu naturel semblent être adaptées à leur habitat respectifs et que les contraintes cognitives des nettoyeurs de l'environnement socialement simple étaient spécifiques au contexte dans lequel ils vivent et dues au fait que la santé des nettoyeurs et leur performance cognitive dans un tâche abstraite ne diffèrent pas entre les deux groupes. Finalement, dans le chapitre 5, j'ai étudié la façon dont les nettoyeurs sont en mesure d'extraire des indices pertinents pour les décisions impliquant la tricherie et la recherche de refuge. J'ai démontré que la capacité des nettoyeurs à généraliser la reconnaissance de différentes espèces de prédateurs dans un contexte d'outil social. Cependant, cette capacité disparait lorsque les nettoyeurs sont testés dans un contexte abstrait.
    Les résultats de cette thèse ont des retombées importantes pour faire avancer notre compréhension de la cognition chez les animaux et de la théorie des jeux évolutifs. Les résultats sont discutés en soulignant l’importance de l'approche écologique de la cognition et en suggérant des possibilités d’amélioration des modèles théoriques sur la question., Cooperation is defined as a ‘helping’ behaviour that provides direct fitness benefits to other individuals. Such behaviours have long intrigued biologists, as it poses a problem for classic evolutionary theory, i.e. why should an individual perform a behaviour that is beneficial to other individuals? Indeed, an expansive body of work on evolutionary game theory, as well as, empirical studies, have provided many mechanisms for promoting stable cooperation between unrelated individuals. Humans, however, often deviate from the optimal strategies predicted by theoretical models, which has emphasized the need to understand decision making processes. For example, the use of decision short cuts, known heuristics (or rules of thumb in non-human animals), allows individuals to make decisions quickly and accurately in frequently occurring situations, but may lead to less than optimal behaviour in novel contexts. Additionally, cognitive constraints, such as learning capabilities or failure to identify relevant environmental or social cues, may also cause deviations from predicated behaviour.
    Using bluestreak ‘cleaner’ wrasse (Labroides dimidiatus) as a model system, the primary aims of this PhD thesis were 1) to investigate important mismatches between standard theoretical predictions regarding animal decisions during cooperative interactions and experimental data, as well as, 2) to explore how well cleaners are able to readily identify and use relevant cues for decision making. Cleaners engage in mutualistic relationships with so-called reef fish ‘clients’, which visit cleaner territories for ectoparasite removal. Cleaners, however, prefer feeding on nitrogen-rich client mucus, which constitutes cheating. Hence, to help ensure a cooperative cleaner, clients employ various partner control mechanisms, including punishment and partner switching. This dynamic cleaning mutualism has hitherto provided strong empirical evidence in support of evolutionary game theory for predicting cooperative behaviour.
    In Chapter 2, however, I demonstrate that cleaners from socially complex reef environments largely outperform cleaners from socially simple reefs in classic cooperation- and cognition-based experiments. A lower abundance and diversity of reef fish clients, as well as, a lower density of cleaners, characterize socially simple reefs. Cleaners from these simple environments generally failed to: 1) feed against their preference, 2) adjust their cooperative behaviour in the presence of an audience, and 3) consistently provide service priority to a temporary food source over a permanent food source. These findings strongly contrast published evidence on cleaner foraging behaviour in laboratory-based experiments. To further understand these inconsistencies, in Chapter 3, I investigated whether the two cleaner groups used different cues when making foraging decisions; specifically, in regards to client service priority. Cleaners from the socially complex reef environment were found to use a precise cue when making decisions, leading to higher accuracy in the laboratory, whereas cleaners from the socially simple reef environment used a correlated cue, or a rule of thumb, which lead to an overall poorer performance.
    In Chapter 4, I determined that the rules applied by the two cleaner groups in nature appear to be locally adaptive and that the cognitive constraints displayed by cleaners from the socially simple reef environment were context specific, as both cleaner body condition and cognitive performance in an abstract task did not differ between reef environments. Finally, in Chapter 5, I investigated how well cleaners are able to extract relevant cues for decisions involving cheating and refuge-seeking. Here, I demonstrated the ability of cleaners to generalize predator species in a social tool context; yet this ability disappeared when cleaners were tested in an abstract context.
    Collectively, these results have important implications for both cognition and evolutionary game theory. The results are discussed with an emphasis placed on the importance of the ecological approach to cognition, as well as, suggestions for future modifications to theoretical models.
  • Publication
    Accès libre
    Strategic social behaviour in wild vervet monkeys
    (2016)
    Borgeaud, Christèle,
    ;
    In comparison to other vertebrates, primates have a large brain in relation to their body size. It has been hypothesised that the degree of social complexity is the major predictor for such variation. In group living species, individuals face various social challenges which can include finding the right balance between cooperation and competition with other group members. Thus to survive and reproduce individuals would have to show an adapted cognitive flexibility. Following this argument, two parallel hypotheses emerged; the “Machiavellian intelligence” and the “Social brain” hypotheses propose that the social complexity of group living selected respectively for advanced cognitive abilities and an increase in relative brain/neocortex size (i.e. complexity). However, finding a positive correlation between the complexity linked to social life, corresponding advanced cognitive processes and brain size/complexity remains challenging. First, adequate proxies of social complexity that could be applied to various taxa remain to be found. Second, examples of strategic social behaviour such as proposed by the Machiavellian intelligence have been described in many taxa suggesting that more comparative studies are needed to distinguish between advanced cognitive processes and those that could rely on associative learning. Finally, a potential link between cognitive abilities and brain/neocortex size remains largely unexplored.
    By studying wild vervet monkeys (Chlorocebus aethiops) in South Africa, the aim of this thesis was to test for the presence of some social knowledge facets in their behaviour. I also wanted to assess their ability to use such knowledge strategically in both cooperation and competition contexts. Vervet monkeys represent an ideal species as they are highly social, have a strict linear female and male hierarchies and are usually very willing to participate in set-up experiments involving food.
    In Chapter I, I tested the effect of natural migration, births and deaths on the individual centrality and strength of dyadic relationships within the grooming, 1m and 5m proximity social networks (i.e. method 1). I also used a new method (i.e. SIENA; method 2) to test both the network structure and the relationships dynamics. With both methods, I found a strong among-group variation. In addition, results suggest that females and juveniles have more influence than males on the stability at both the individual and dyadic levels, especially within the grooming network. Social relationships might be subject to frequent and significant changes often linked to natural demographic variation. Thus, social network analyses have the potential to capture important aspects of the cognitive social challenges an individual has to cope with. In Chapter II, I conducted rank reversal playbacks to test vervet monkeys’ knowledge about the entire group’s hierarchy. I found that females know about both female and male hierarchies while males and juveniles seem to lack such knowledge about the female hierarchy. Results therefore suggest sex and developmental differences in the extent of third party rank relationships. In Chapter III, I first trained females to consistently approach their personalised boxes to obtain a food reward, which allowed staging potential conflicts by placing two boxes next to each other. With such experiments I could show that subordinates trade grooming for tolerance and coalitionary support and that such trading is modified by the composition of the audience (i.e. individuals within 10m). However data also suggest that subordinates are not able to incorporate the effect of their grooming on dominants’ decision-making to their own advantage.
    In summary, the results of this thesis provide important insights on vervet social strategies and underlying cognitive processes. The introduced methodological advances regarding social network analyses and experimentation to reveal social strategies offer a basis for future research on other primate species for comparison. Such data would then be amenable for correlative studies that link the results to brain evolution. In such a way, one can hope to make important progress regarding the major quest: to assess how social complexity, strategic social behaviours and brain size are interlinked.
  • Publication
    Accès libre
    Adjustments of levels of cooperation in cleaner wrasse "Labroides dimidiatus": the effects of an audience and satiation
    (2015)
    Pinto, Ana Isabel
    ;
    La coopération, soit l’entraide entre individus sans lien de parenté, est une énigme évolutive. Cela est dû au fait que l’aide est souvent un investissement qui doit générer des avantages futurs pour pouvoir faire l’objet d’une sélection positive. Généralement, la sélection naturelle favorise les individus qui adoptent un comportement égoïste. La tricherie devient donc une question conceptuelle majeure. Cependant, les exemples de coopération sont nombreux dans la nature. De ce fait, la recherche d'explications réconciliant la coopération avec la théorie de l'évolution a longtemps été d’une importance majeure en biologie, mais également dans les sciences sociales, l’objectif étant d'expliquer la complexité sociale chez l'homme. Divers mécanismes dits de contrôle du partenaire - des réponses comportementales qui entraînent une réduction des gains d'un partenaire tricheur de sorte qu'un partenaire coopérant gagne davantage - se sont avérés efficaces pour stabiliser la coopération. Mes recherches sur ce sujet ce sont axées en particulier sur le rôle du prestige social dans un réseau de communication. En effet, de nombreuses interactions animales sont observées par des tiers («spectateurs»), qui peuvent obtenir des informations extrêmement utiles sur les interactants. Dans le contexte de la coopération, les spectateurs doivent ainsi essayer d'identifier des individus singulièrement coopératifs comme futurs partenaires, ce qui permet de sélectionner les individus particulièrement coopératifs s'ils sont observés.
    Mon système modèle a consisté d’un mutualisme de nettoyage marin impliquant des labres nettoyeurs (Labroides dimidiatus) et ses poissons de récif dit «clients» qui leur rendent visite pour se faire enlever les ectoparasites. Cependant, des conflits surgissent car les nettoyeurs préfèrent la couche de mucus protectrice des clients aux ectoparasites, où se nourrir de mucus est préjudiciable au client et est donc fonctionnellement considéré comme de la tricherie. Par conséquent, les clients doivent faire en sorte que les nettoyeurs mangent contre leur préférence afin de pouvoir bénéficier d'un bon service de nettoyage. Des observations sur le terrain et une expérience de laboratoire utilisant des plaques en plexiglas en remplacement de clients avaient déjà suggéré que les clients spectateurs étaient attentifs à la manière dont un nettoyeur traite son client actuel et que les nettoyeurs sont plus coopératifs s’ils sont observés. J'ai pu démontrer ce concept de prestige social pour la première fois dans le cadre d'une expérience de laboratoire contrôlée utilisant de véritables interactions client-nettoyeur. Dans deux autres expériences utilisant soit des plaques en plexiglas soit de vrais clients, j'ai montré que les nettoyeurs peuvent ajuster la qualité de leurs services à l'importance relative du client actuel par rapport au client spectateur: plus le spectateur a de la valeur, plus le service envers le client actuel est peaufiné. Dans une troisième expérience, j’ai manipulé le niveau de satiété des nettoyeurs afin de tester la prédiction de la théorie du marché biologique selon laquelle un besoin d’interactions temporairement faible entraîne une baisse de la qualité du service. De manière quelque peu surprenante, cette prédiction n’a pas été confirmée, les nettoyeurs rassassiés ayant augmenté leur niveau de coopération envers leurs clients, c’est-à-dire qu’ils ont moins triché lors des interactions avec leurs clients et se sont nourris davantage contre leur préférence sur les plaques en plexiglas. Ainsi, les nettoyeurs rassassiés investissent fonctionnellement dans leur relation avec les clients pour des avantages futurs.
    En conclusion, mon travail de recherche démontre que le labre nettoyeur L. dimidiatus, est capable de prendre des décisions sophistiquées, adaptées aux spécificités de la situation. Les résultats soulèvent des questions concernant les processus cognitifs sous-jacents, car ils remettent en cause la notion selon laquelle des cerveaux plus larges sont nécessaires pour une coopération sophistiquée. Au lieu de cela, il semble qu'une approche écologique par rapport à la cognition soit plus appropriée pour expliquer mes résultats. Mon étude s'inscrit dans une longue tradition selon laquelle les poissons constituent des systèmes modèles idéaux pour tester la théorie de la coopération, dont les résultats prometteurs devraient inspirer de nouvelles analyses théoriques., Cooperation, the mutual helping between unrelated individuals, is an evolutionary puzzle. This is because helping is often an investment that must yield future benefits in order to be under positive selection. Generally, natural selection favours individuals that perform self-serving behaviour, and hence cheating is a major conceptual issue. However, examples of cooperation are abundant in nature. As such, finding explanations that reconcile cooperation with evolutionary theory has long been a major focus in biology but also in the social sciences with their aim to explain the social complexity in humans. A variety of so-called partner control mechanisms – behavioural responses that cause a reduction in the payoffs of a cheating partner such that a cooperating partner gains more – have been shown to stabilise cooperation. My research has focused in particular on the role of social prestige in a communication network. Many animal interactions are observed by third parties (“bystanders”), who may gain valuable information about the interactants. In the context of cooperation, bystanders should try to identify particularly cooperative individuals as future partners, which selects for individuals being particularly cooperative if they are observed.
    My model system has been marine cleaning mutualism involving bluestreak cleaner wrasses (Labroides dimidiatus) and their so-called “client” reef fishes that visit to have ectoparasites removed. However, conflict arises as cleaners prefer the protective mucus layer of clients over ectoparasites, where mucus feeding is detrimental to the client and hence functionally constitutes cheating. Thus, clients have to make cleaners feed against their preference in order to receive a good cleaning service. Field observations and a laboratory experiment using Plexiglas plates as client surrogates had already suggested that bystander clients pay attention to how a cleaner treats its current client, and that cleaners are more cooperative if observed. I could demonstrate this social prestige concept for the first time in a controlled laboratory experiment in real cleaner-client interactions. In two further experiments using either plates or real clients I showed that cleaners can fine-tune their service quality to the relative importance of current client versus bystander: the more valuable the bystander the better the current service. Finally, I manipulated the cleaners’ level of satiation in order to test the prediction from biological market theory that a temporarily low need for interactions causes a decrease in service quality. Somewhat surprisingly, this prediction was not met as satiated cleaners increased their cooperation levels towards their clients, i.e. they caused less jolts during interactions with their clients and fed more against their preference on plates. Thus, satiated cleaners functionally invest into their relationship with clients for future benefits.
    In conclusion, my work shows that cleaner wrasse L. dimidiatus show sophisticated decision rules that are fine-tuned to the specifics of the situation. The results raise questions concerning the underlying cognitive processes as they challenge the notion that large brains are necessary for sophisticated cooperation. Instead, it appears that an ecological approach to cognition is better suited to explain my results. My study fits into a long tradition that fish yield ideal model systems to test cooperation theory, where results hopefully inspire further theoretical analyses.
  • Publication
    Accès libre
    Social strategies and tool use in wild corvids
    (2014)
    Di Lascio, Felice Elias
    ;
    Les corvidés ont suscité un intérêt croissant ces dernières années à cause des capacités cognitives très développées que ces oiseaux semblent posséder. Ceci leur a valu le surnom de « singes à plumes ». En effet, les travaux de recherches menés ces deux dernières décennies ont montré que les corvidés possèdent des capacités cognitives qui pourraient rivaliser avec celles de certains singes. Les oiseaux au sein de cette famille ont tendance à former des couples monogames sur le long terme. Dans ces relations les partenaires se soutiennent mutuellement lors de conflits avec d’autres individus, collaborent pour élever leurs descendants, en bref, coopèrent dans une variété de contextes. La forte interdépendance entre partenaires de reproduction ainsi que la nature hautement qualitative de ces relations ont été proposées comme étant la base ayant servi à l’évolution de l’intelligence supérieure de ces oiseaux, car dans une telle relation, les partenaires doivent coordonner leurs activités et donc comprendre les besoins ainsi que les intentions de l’autre. En parallèle, d’autres expériences menées en captivité ont montré que les corbeaux freux (Corvus frugilegus) et les corbeaux de Nouvelle-Calédonie (Corvus moneduloides) pourraient faire usage de cette intelligence pour se servir et comprendre les propriétés fonctionnelles d’outils, alors qu’étonnamment les corbeaux freux ne se servent pas d’outils dans la nature. Sur la base des observations faites sur les deux espèces susmentionnées, à l’heure actuelle, l’idée la plus largement acceptée est que l’utilisation d’outils n’est pas une capacité spécialisée présente uniquement chez quelques espèces au sein de ce groupe mais bien une capacité partagée par la plupart des espèces de cette famille d’oiseaux. A ce jour, le lien entre ces capacités remarquables, leur intelligence, vraisemblablement acquise dans le contexte de la vie de couple, reste controversé car la plupart des expériences précédemment menées, ont porté sur de petits groupes d’oiseaux élevés en captivité. Le but principal de cette thèse était par conséquent de compléter ces études antérieures grâce à des observations et des expériences menées sur le terrain de façon à mieux comprendre si les résultats obtenus en laboratoire reflètent les capacités d’oiseaux vivant en liberté en étudiant deux espèces de corvidés : les corbeaux freux et les corneilles (Corvus corone corone) dans leur habitat naturel. Les corbeaux freux sont des oiseaux qui vivent et se reproduisent dans des colonies densément peuplées ce qui a pour conséquence que les conflits pour le matériel de nidification, l’accès aux femelles ou encore les sites de nidification sont fréquents. Cette première espèce est donc idéale pour étudier et mieux comprendre les conflits et les stratégies coopératives mis en œuvre par ces oiseaux afin d’en réduire la fréquence ainsi que les conséquences. Dans le chapitre un, nous décrivons en détail comment les corbeaux freux volent le matériel de nidification sur les nids d’autres couples au sein de la colonie. En outre, nous avons étudié si les couples nichant à proximité les uns des autres (voisins) coopèrent dans ce contexte en évitant de se voler réciproquement. De plus, nous avons étudié la manière dont les partenaires au sein du couple se coordonnent de manière à surveiller le nid et à collecter les matériaux nécessaires à la construction du nid. Nous avons cherché à comprendre dans quelle mesure la coordination du couple influe sur la fréquence à laquelle ils se font voler. Dans le deuxième chapitre, nous avons examiné plus en détail la façon dont se comportent les corbeaux freux à la suite d’un conflit. Plus spécifiquement, nous avons cherché à quantifier la fréquence des comportements affiliatifs échangés entre anciens adversaires (réconciliation) ainsi que la fréquence de ces comportements amicaux entre la victime ou l’agresseur et une troisième partie (consolation). Finalement, dans le chapitre trois, nous avons étudié si des corneilles sauvages sont capables de résoudre un problème nécessitant l’utilisation d’un outil. A cette fin, nous nous sommes servis d’un tube de plexiglas fixé sur un cadre en bois. Ce dernier était placé à différents endroits sur le terrain. Dans le tube, nous avons ensuite inséré un morceau de nourriture et les corneilles avaient à leur disposition des outils (branche pourvue à l’une de ces extrémités d’un crochet) afin d’extraire la nourriture du dispositif expérimental. Les principaux résultats du chapitre un indiquent que les corbeaux freux volent des branches principalement sur les nids voisins et que les couples les mieux coordonnés étaient ceux qui se faisaient voler du matériel de nidification le moins fréquemment. Dans le chapitre deux, les résultats indiquent que les partenaires au sein du couple échangeaient des comportements affiliatifs à des fréquences plus élevées à la suite d’une agression que dans des situations contrôles. A l’inverse, un tel phénomène n’a pas été observé entre anciens adversaires. Finalement, les résultats du troisième et dernier chapitre indiquent que les corneilles ne sont pas en mesure de se servir des outils que nous leurs avons mis à disposition et cela même après avoir reçu plusieurs essais récompensés. Dans l’ensemble, les deux premiers chapitres indiquent que les corbeaux freux coopèrent principalement avec leurs partenaires de reproduction et que d’autres relations sociales sont moins importantes étant donné qu’ils n’ont ni coopéré avec leurs voisins ni ne se sont réconciliés avec leurs anciens adversaires. Ces découvertes confirment les résultats d’études antérieures menées sur des oiseaux captifs, c’est-à-dire, que ces animaux ont une tendance limitée à coopérer avec d’autres individus de leur espèce en dehors de leur partenaire de reproduction. A l’inverse, les résultats du chapitre trois tendent à renforcer l’idée que la capacité à utiliser des outils est limitée à certaines espèces au sein de ce groupe plutôt qu’une capacité plus largement répandue parmi le groupe des corvidés comme cela a été suggéré précédemment., Crows and ravens have attracted increasing attention because of the advanced cognitive capacities these birds seem to possess, which have earned them the nickname of “feathered apes”. Indeed, the work carried out in the last two decades has shown that corvids possess abilities that can rival those of monkeys and apes. Birds within this family tend to form long-term monogamous bonds, where pair partners support each other in agonistic encounters, collaborate to raise descendants, i.e., cooperate in a variety of contexts. The strong interdependency between mating partners and the high-qualitative nature of these relationships have been proposed to be the ground for the evolution of their higher intelligence; because in such relationships, pair partners need to coordinate their activities and eventually understand each other’s needs or intentions. In parallel, other experiments have shown that rooks (Corvus frugilegus) and New Caledonian crows (Corvus moneduloides) might use this intelligence to make use of tools and to understand the functional properties of these tools, even though rooks are not known to use tools in nature. Based on these two main species, currently, the most widely accepted idea is that tool use is not a specialized capacity present only in a few species of this group but rather a capacity that is shared among many representatives of this family. To date, the link between these remarkable capacities, their intelligence, presumably acquired in the context of pair bonding, remains contentious because most previous studies were carried out on small groups of captive birds. The aim of this thesis was to complement those previous studies with field observations / experiments to better understand whether laboratory results reflect the typical capacities of free-ranging birds by studying two different species of corvids, rooks and carrion crows (Corvus corone corone) in their natural habitat. Rooks are colonial breeding birds that live in dense colonies where conflicts over nesting material, females and nesting position are frequent. This first species is hence ideal to study conflicts and what cooperative strategies these birds use to limit the occurrence and consequences of conflicts. In chapter one we describe how rooks steal nesting material from other nests within the colony and studied whether close nesting pairs (neighbours) cooperate by avoiding to steal each other’s nesting material. Additionally, we studied how mating partners coordinate between guarding the nest and collecting the required materials and whether this influences the frequency of thefts received at nest. In chapter two we examined in more details how rooks behave after a conflict. In particular we quantified the frequency of affiliative behaviours exchanged among former opponents (reconciliation) and between the victim or the aggressor and a third-party (consolation). Finally in chapter three, we studied whether wild carrion crows are able to solve a simple tool use task. The experimental apparatus consisted of a Plexiglas tube fixed on a wooden frame and placed in the field in which we inserted a piece of food. The crows had at their disposal the tools (hooked sticks) to extract the reward. The main results of chapter one are that rooks mainly stole twigs form neighbouring nests and that better coordinated pairs received fewer thefts. In chapter two pair partners exchanged higher frequencies of affiliative behaviours after a conflict happened compared to control situations whereas no such phenomenon was observed between former opponents. Finally, in chapter three our main finding is that carrion crows were unable to use the tools provided even having received several rewarded trial. Overall, the first two chapters indicate that rooks mainly cooperate with their mating partners and that other social relationships are less important given that they neither cooperated with close neighbours nor reconciled with former opponents. These findings confirm previous results on captive birds that all showed that rooks have a limited tendency to cooperate with other individuals than their mating partners. In contrast the findings of chapter three rather tend to strengthen the idea that tool use is a specialized capacity of some species and not a widespread capacity among corvids as has been suggested previously.
  • Publication
    Accès libre
    Cooperation and deception: from evolution to mechanisms
    (2010)
    Brosnan, Sarah F.
    ;
    Nature is full of struggle, as predicted by the theory of evolution through natural selection, yet there are also paramount examples where individuals help each other. These instances of helping have been difficult to reconcile with Darwin's theory because it is not always obvious how individuals are working for their own direct benefit. Consequently, initial publications that offered solutions to subsets of the observed cases of helping, such as kin selection or reciprocity, are among the most influential and most cited papers in evolution/behavioural ecology. During the last few years, a wave of new studies and concepts has considerably advanced our understanding of the conditions under which individuals are selected to help others. On the empirical side, advances are due to stronger incorporation of the natural history of each study species and an emphasis on proximate questions regarding decision-making processes. In parallel, theorists have provided more realistic models together with an increased exploration of the importance of life history and ecology in understanding cooperation. The ideas presented by the authors of this volume represent, in many ways, the revolutionary new approach to studying behaviour which is currently underway.
  • Publication
    Accès libre
    Cleaning in pairs enhances honesty in male cleaning gobies
    (2009)
    Soares, Marta C.
    ;
    ;
    Côté, Isabelle M.
    A recent game theoretic model akin to an iterated prisoner's dilemma explored situations in which 2 individuals (the service providers) interact simultaneously with the same service recipient (the client). If providing a dishonest service pays, then each service provider may be tempted to cheat before its partner, even if cheating causes the client's departure; however, a theoretical cooperative solution also exists where both partners should reduce cheating rates. This prediction is supported by indirect measures of cheating (i.e., inferred from client responses) by pairs of Indo-Pacific bluestreak cleaner wrasses Labroides dimidiatus. Here, we examine how inspecting in pairs affects service quality in Caribbean cleaning gobies Elacatinus spp. We measured dishonesty directly by examining the stomach contents of solitary and paired individuals and calculating the ratio of scales to ectoparasites ingested. We found that the propensity to cheat of females and males differed: females always cleaned relatively honestly, whereas males cheated less when cleaning in pairs than when cleaning alone. However, overall, the cleaning service of single and paired individuals was similar. Our results confirm that cleaners cooperate when cleaning in pairs; however, our findings differ from the specific predictions of the model and the observations on L. dimidiatus. The differences may be due to differences in mating systems and cleaner–client interactions between the 2 cleaner fish species.
  • Publication
    Accès libre
    Strategic adjustment of service quality to client identity in the cleaner shrimp, Periclimenes longicarpus
    (2009)
    Chapuis, Lucille
    ;
    Cleaning mutualism, in which cleaning organisms remove ectoparasites from cooperating ‘clients’, is widespread among marine animals. Until now, research has focused on fishes as cleaners, whereas cleaner shrimps have received little attention. The aim of this study was to investigate the cleaning behaviour of the cleaner shrimp, Periclimenes longicarpus, and to compare the results directly to data on the sympatric and well-studied cleaner wrasse, Labroides dimidiatus. We first compared the time spent cleaning and client diversity as indicators of the potential importance of the cleaner shrimp to client health and found strong similarities between shrimp and wrasse. We further looked at three correlates of service quality: duration of interactions, tactile stimulation of clients, and jolt rates as correlates of mucus feeding (=cheating). We specifically predicted that shrimps would cheat clients less frequently than the wrasses because they should be more vulnerable to aggressive responses by clients. Although the results partly support our hypothesis, they also suggest that both species strategically adjust cheating rates according to risk, as predatory clients jolted less frequently than nonpredatory clients. In conclusion, the results suggest that the shrimps play an important role in client health but that nonpredatory clients have to control the shrimps' behaviour to receive a good service.