Voici les éléments 1 - 10 sur 25
  • Publication
    Accès libre
    Imagination at the frontiers of cultural psychology
    (New York/Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018) ;
    Glaveanu, Vlad Petre
    ;
    ;
    Glaveanu, Vlad Petre
  • Publication
    Accès libre
    Imagination in adults and the aging person: Possible futures and actual past
    (New York/Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018) ;
    Sato, Tatsuya
    ;
    ;
    Glaveanu, Vlad Petre
  • Publication
    Métadonnées seulement
    Difficult differences: a socio-cultural analysis of how diversity can enable and inhibit creativity
    (2019-7-24) ;
    Gillespie, Alex
    ;
    The relationship between diversity and creativity can be seen as paradoxical. A diversity of perspectives should be advantageous for collaborative creativity, yet its benefits are often offset by adverse social processes. One suggestion for overcoming these negative effects is perspective taking. We compared four dyads with low scores on trait perspective taking with four dyads who were high on trait perspective taking on a brainstorming task followed by reconstructive interviews. Trait‐based perspective taking was strongly associated with greater creativity. However, contrary with expectation, interactional perspective taking behaviors (including questioning, signaling understanding, repairing) were associated with lesser creativity. The dyads that generated the fewest ideas were most likely to get stuck within ideational domains, struggling to understand one‐another, having to elaborate and justify their ideas more. In contrast, the dyads that generated many ideas were more likely to recognize each other's ideas as valuable without extensive justification or negotiation. We suggest that perspective taking is crucially important for mediating diversity in the generation of new ideas not only because it enables understanding the perspective of the other, but because it entails an atmosphere of tolerance, playfulness, and mutual recognition.
  • Publication
    Accès libre
    Experience on the Edge: Theorizing Liminality
    (Cham (Switzerland): Springer, 2021)
    Wagoner, Brady
    ;
    Liminality has become a key concept within the social sciences, with a growing number of publications devoted to it in recent years. The concept is needed to address those aspects of human experience and social life that fall outside of ordered structures. In contrast to the clearly defined roles and routines that define so much of industrial work and economic life, it highlights spaces of transition, indefiniteness, ambiguity, play and creativity. Thus, it is an indispensable concept and a necessary counterweight to the overemphasis on structural influences on human behavior. This book aims to use the concept of liminality to develop a culturally and experientially sensitive psychology. This is accomplished by first setting out an original theoretical framework focused on understanding the ‘liminal sources of cultural experience,’ and second an application of concept to a number of different domains, such as tourism, pilgrimage, aesthetics, children’s play, art therapy, and medical diagnosis. Finally, all these domains are then brought together in a concluding commentary chapter that puts them in relation to an overarching theoretical framework. This book will be useful for graduate students and researchers in cultural psychology, critical psychology, psychosocial psychology, developmental psychology, health psychology, anthropology and the social sciences, cultural studies among others.
  • Publication
    Accès libre
    Difficult differences: A socio-cultural analysis of how diversity can nable and inhibit creativity
    (2017-12-22) ;
    Gillespie, Alex
    ;
    The relationship between diversity and creativity can be seen as paradoxical. A diversity of perspectives should be advantageous for collaborative creativity, yet its benefits are often offset by adverse social processes. One suggestion for overcoming these negative effects is perspective taking. We compared four dyads with low scores on trait perspective taking with four dyads who were high on trait perspective taking on a brainstorming task followed by reconstructive interviews. Trait-based perspective taking was strongly associated with greater creativity. However, contrary with expectation, interactional perspective taking behaviors (including questioning, signaling understanding, repairing) were associated with lesser creativity. The dyads that generated the fewest ideas were most likely to get stuck within ideational domains, struggling to understand one-another, having to elaborate and justify their ideas more. In contrast, the dyads that generated many ideas were more likely to recognize each other’s ideas as valuable without extensive justification or negotiation. We suggest that perspective taking is crucially important for mediating diversity in the generation of new ideas not only because it enables understanding the perspective of the other, but because it entails an atmosphere of tolerance, playfulness, and mutual recognition.
  • Publication
    Accès libre
    A lesson in dialogical thinking
    (2017-4-11)
    Book review of The dialogical mind: Common sense and ethics, by Ivana Markova´. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2016. 260 pages. ISBN: 9781107002555
  • Publication
    Métadonnées seulement
    Symbolic resources and imagination in the dynamics of life
    (Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2018) ;
    Rosa, Alberto
    ;
    Valsiner, Jaan
    This chapter presents two mutually dependent conceptual developments in sociocultural psychology: the concept of “symbolic resources” and a theory of imagination. It argues that, although both have been considered as side problems, these might actually enable to highlight fundamental dynamics in the study of human development in the lifecourse, as well as cultural change. The chapter is organized five sections. The first section sketches a sociocultural psychology of lifecourse and highlights some of its challenges. The second section presents a sociocultural psychological theory, while the third retraces the concept of symbolic resources. These two sections each present a short historical summary and a theoretical model. The fourth section puts these two concepts at work, and shows how they may participate to the definition of the lifecourse and societal change, but also, how these can be constrained. The fifth section opens on further theoretical and methodological challenges.
  • Publication
    Accès libre
    The wind of thinking
    (2022-5-31)
    The Life of the Mind (1978) opens with a reflection of thinking. By thinking, Hannah Arendt means our capacity to withdraw from the world so as to reflect about the meaning of things. Thinking is an activity with no results in itself: searching for meaning, it cannot reach a goal, as any meaning hence produced can only be questioned again. Thinking is made possible through imagination, and demands the use of language and metaphors. It also has to be part of a form of inner dialogue – a moment in which we become two-in-one. Hence, Arendt seems to define thinking as a dynamic, mediated dialogical process of meaning making. In this paper, I first situate Arendt’s reflection on thinking within her life work. I then present her main propositions: that thinking is not knowing; that it demands a form of withdrawal; that it implies imagination; that it is mediated by language and metaphors; that it is a form of inner dialogue; and that it escapes time. Finally, I examine some of the implications of this approach to thinking for contemporary cultural psychology.
  • Publication
    Accès libre
    Imagination in Human and Cultural Development
    (London: Routledge, 2016) ;
    Gillespie, Alex
    This book positions imagination as a central concept which increases the understanding of daily life, personal life choices, and the way in which culture and society changes. Case studies from micro instances of reverie and daydreaming, to utopian projects, are included and analysed. The theoretical focus is on imagination as a force free from immediate constraints, forming the basis of our individual and collective agency. In each chapter, the authors review and integrate a wide range of classic and contemporary literature culminating in the proposal of a sociocultural model of imagination. The book takes into account the triggers of imagination, the content of imagination, and the outcomes of imagination. At the heart of the model is the interplay between the individual and culture; an exploration of how the imagination, as something very personal and subjective, grows out of our shared culture, and how our shared culture can be transformed by acts of imagination. Imagination in Human and Cultural Development offers new perspectives on the study of psychological learning, change, innovation and creativity throughout the lifespan. The book will appeal to academics and scholars in the fields of psychology and the social sciences, especially those with an interest in development, social change, cultural psychology, imagination and creativity.
  • Publication
    Accès libre
    Art, imagination, et les limites du dialogue
    (Lausanne: Antipodes, 2021) ;
    Muller Mirza, Nathalie
    ;
    Le dialogisme est à la fois une épistémologie, une perspective théorique et une éthique (Grossen, 2007; Marková, 2016). Il invite à examiner les conditions relationnelles du mouvement de la pensée, de l’expérience, et de leur expression. Dans cette contribution, je me propose de relire les données de deux terrains, l’un portant sur le développement de jeunes adolescents, l’autre sur celui des personnes âgées (Grossen, Zittoun, & Ros, 2012; Zittoun, Grossen, & Salamin Tarrago, In press). Dans les deux cas, l’objet d’étude est devenu la relation des personnes à des objets culturels spécifiques, dans des institutions particulières. Les institutions sont en effet le lieu de déploiement de dialogues entre personnes, entre personnes et objets culturels, et entre celles-ci et le monde social dans lequel d’inscrit l’institution. Etant donné qu’elles concentrent toujours des tensions socioculturelles plus larges, les institutions peuvent souvent mettre en danger les dialogues que chacun mène avec soi-même et avec les autres. Pourtant, nos observations montrent aussi comment, en entrant en dialogue avec un objet culturel – un roman, une chanson, une œuvre d’art – les personnes peuvent soutenir et renforcer une forme de dialogicité fondamentale. Dans ce chapitre, je commence par présenter le dialogisme aujourd’hui, la manière dont il a été travaillé par Michèle Grossen, et comment il nous permet de problématiser les institutions. J’examine ensuite deux situations tirées des terrains cités plus haut, et je montre comment l’institution peut menacer le dialogue, mais aussi, la manière dont les personnes parviennent à maintenir une dialogicité malgré tout. Comme il est parfois difficile de faire des analyses fines de ce type de situations, je me tourne alors vers un exemple tiré de la littérature, et qui montre comment, même dans une situation institutionnelle totalitaire et donc monologisante, des personnes peuvent maintenir et déployer une très grande dialogicité.