Voici les éléments 1 - 7 sur 7
  • Publication
    Métadonnées seulement
    Organizational linkages for new product development: Implementation of innovation projects
    (2016-6)
    Cometto, Teresa
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    ;
    Palacios, Miguel
    ;
    Le Meunier-FitzHugh, Kenneth
    ;
    Labadie, Gaston
  • Publication
    Métadonnées seulement
  • Publication
    Métadonnées seulement
    Crowdsourcing and organizational forms: emerging trends and research implications
    (2016-5)
    Palacios, Miguel
    ;
    Martinez-Corral, Alberto
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    ;
    Grijalvo, Mercedes
    Finding new sources for ideas and solutions is central to the innovation process. Organizations are increasing the use of crowd and crowd-based platforms to find novel solutions, raise capital, develop new products, pursue collaborative ventures, and develop outcome-based services. Researchers are using crowdsourcing to describe this breadth and depth of organizational level engagement with the crowd for explaining search behavior for innovative action. Despite crowdsourcing's potential, most of the research on crowdsourcing focuses around the end functionality of crowdsourcing in the innovation process (e.g., end-product development, continuous feedback, and collaborative ventures). What is missing from the current research is a certain level of inquiry into the theoretical foundations and their implications for subjects like organizational forms and institutional logic that are central for crowd-level engagement. Against this background, this study identifies emerging research themes within crowdsourcing, and maps out the future research lines.
  • Publication
    Métadonnées seulement
    Organizational linkages for new product development: Implementation of innovation projects
    (2015-7-30)
    Cometto, Teresa
    ;
    ;
    Palacios, Miguel
    ;
    Le Meunier-FitzHugh, Kenneth
    ;
    Labadie, Gaston
  • Publication
    Métadonnées seulement
    Scaling ventures through crowdsourcing: Setting the research agenda
    (2015-7-15)
    Palacios, Miguel
    ;
    Martinez, Alberto
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    ;
    Grijalvo, Mercedes
    There is growing trend towards the use of crowd by organizations for idea generation, finding novel solutions and even financing to scale up new ventures. As a result, the academic discourse on crowdsourcing is on the rise (see Afuah & Tucci, 2012; Lehner, 2013; Jeppensen & Lakahani, 2010) particularly due to some anecdotal evidence of various organizations like Mosaic Inc, Wikipedia, Threadline, and Innocentive. However, for most organizations, crowdsourcing is particularly unfamiliar ground. It requires new thinking, new resources and new capabilities to effectively navigate the creative and unpredictable processes of engaging with the crowd, and manage both high-impact results and risks. This is also true in the academic literature of crowdsourcing. We find that the body of literature that has been produced is detailed but constricted, often drawing insights within distinct disciplines such as finance, entrepreneurship or marketing. This paper contributes on three levels: firstly, it provides a comprehensive overview of the literature on crowdsourcing by theorizing different forms of crowdsourcing and subsets that are often used interchangeably. Secondly, by defining the different theoretical constructs related to crowdsourcing, it maps out a research agenda. Lastly, it proposes a classification of crowdsourcing initiatives based on the mode/level of engagement with the crowd. Finally, by producing a holistic research agenda, this article acts as catalyst for improving the navigation complexity for organizations and scholars alike.
  • Publication
    Métadonnées seulement
    Hybrid Organizations: Defining Characteristics and Key innovation Factors
    (2015-7-13)
    Trones, Maren
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    Lunnan, Anders
    ;
    Hybrid organizations surpass the boundaries between typical for-profit and non-profit entities, by being both market-oriented and mission-centered. Hybrid organizations use market forces to solve social and environmental issues, and engage in commercial activities to sustain their operations. They can be promising agents of multiple value creation, by offering alternative approaches for addressing economic, social and environmental needs. However, as these organizations don’t correspond with established organizational forms, they may experience difficulties in maintaining their hybrid form. Such organizations often exist between the institutionally legitimate forms of organizing, as they combine conflicting institutional logics. As a result , these organizations face challenges related to legal form, financing and organizational culture. This paper looks at the characteristics of hybrid organizations, and how they can maintain their organizational sustainability and hybrid nature. Through a phenomenological research design consisting of individual interviews with five entrepreneurs who have experienced success with their hybrid business in Latin America, the study links existing theories of hybrid organizations with empirical evidence, and shows that the organizations are characterized by having realistic visionaries as founders, innovative business model design, novel forms of financing like crowdfunding and environmental/social mission embedded in the organizational identity. Moreover, the study shows that the legal and financial framework for hybrids are not fully developed yet. The majority of the founders have considered novel forms of financing like crowdfunding as a viable source of finance, but only one of the companies have conducted a campaign on a crowdfunding platform. In this paper, we argue that key factors in understanding how the organizations sustain their hybrid nature are related to their activity system and organizational identity.. Organizations can more easily sustain their hybrid nature by designing business models that have integrated social, environmental and commercial activities. The organizations from this study have managed to foster an organizational culture committed to multiple missions and effective operations, despite having diverse workforces as well. This means that identifying and communicating organizational values are crucial for the viability of hybrid organizations. Several of the companies report to benefit internally from their hybrid nature, which may be explained by how the individuals define themselves and the enterprise.