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  • Publication
    Métadonnées seulement
    Moderating effects of attributions on the relationship between emotinal dissonance and surface acting: a transactinal approach to health care professionals' emotion work
    (2013)
    Crego, Antonio
    ;
    Martinez-Inigo, David
    ;
    Based on a transactional model of stress, this study aims to understand the role played by attributions in selecting surface acting as emotion regulation strategy whencopingwithemotion-ruledissonance.Asampleofprimaryhealthcareprofes- sionals (n = 87) based in Madrid filled in a questionnaire. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses were conducted to test hypotheses on the moderating effects of attributions on the relationship between emotion-rule dissonance and surface acting.Resultsshowedthathighlevelsof attributiontopatientsof responsibilityfor negative events, low levels of professionals’ self-accountability, and low attribution of being able to promote a positive change strengthen the positive association betweenemotion-ruledissonanceandsurfaceacting.Thiscouldexplainwhyprofes- sionalsuseapotentiallydamagingemotionregulationstrategy.
  • Publication
    Métadonnées seulement
    The effect of positive events at work on after-work fatigue: They matter most in face of adversity
    (2011)
    Gross, Sven
    ;
    Semmer, Norbert K.
    ;
    Meier, Laurenz L
    ;
    Kälin, Wolfgang
    ;
    ;
    There is evidence that daily negative events at work enhance fatigue. In contrast, positive events may trigger processes that increase, but also processes that decrease, energetic resources. Accordingly, results regarding a main effect of positive events on fatigue have been mixed. However, a clearer pattern between positive events and fatigue can be expected under adverse circumstances (i.e., accumulation of negative events, high chronic stressors). Positive events may facilitate coping and accelerate recovery processes and, thus, reduce resource drain due to daily negative events and chronic stressors. Predicting fatigue in a diary study with 76 employees, we investigated interactions between daily positive events and (a) daily negative events and (b) chronic social stressors. Multilevel modeling revealed that negative but not positive events were associated with increased end-of-work fatigue. However, positive events interacted with negative events and with chronic social stressors. As expected, positive events were negatively associated with fatigue only on days with many negative events, but not so on days with few negative events. Analogously, positive events were negatively associated with fatigue only among employees with high, compared with low, chronic social stressors. We conclude that the beneficial short-term effects of positive events on energetic resources are largely confined to adverse circumstances. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved)