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  • Publication
    Métadonnées seulement
    Transnational mobility among early-career academics: gendered aspects of negotiations and arrangements within heterosexual couples
    Today, transnational mobility is often presented as indispensable for a successful academic career. This institutionalisation of transnational mobility for young academics has important effects in (re)producing or transforming gender inequalities. Building on the results of a qualitative study conducted at three universities – Zurich (Switzerland), UCLA (U.S.A), and Cambridge (UK) – this paper examines the mobility experiences of early-career academics and their partners and seeks to understand the gendered mechanisms underlying mobility patterns. Drawing on three case studies, this paper focuses on the negotiations and arrangements of mobile couples. Each case study represents a different ideal-typical pattern of how gender is entangled with mobility. We show how gender is ‘done’ and ‘undone’ by the academics and their partners throughout these mobility trajectories, and how these couples’ negotiations and practices are closely entangled with gender representations that are structurally anchored in labour markets and discursively expressed within the wider social environment. As such, this paper questions the dichotomy between economic men and social and cultural women sometimes reproduced in studies on highly skilled migration. Furthermore, the findings challenge earlier studies that suggest a causal link between mobility and the leaky pipeline by showing that important transformations with regard to gender relations are occurring.
  • Publication
    Accès libre
    Gender matters! Le genre comme élément crucial de la production des inégalités
    Le genre est, aujourd’hui encore, un élément crucial dans la fabrication des inégalités sociales. Bien que l’égalité entre femmes et hommes soit en principe acquise sur le plan légal, les lois et les politiques en Suisse sont, de fait, sous-tendues par un régime de genre que nous appelons « classique » et qui se caractérise par une binarité cisgenre et hétéronormative. Ce régime classique reproduit un double paradoxe des inégalités de genre.
  • Publication
    Accès libre
    Transnational mobility networks and academic social capital among early‐career academics: beyond common‐sense assumptions
    Academic mobility is increasingly presented as indispensable for a successful academic career. This imperative is rooted in the assumption that mobility contributes to academic excellence because it allows academics to build transnational academic networks. Based on biographical interviews and an analysis of the mobility networks of early‐career academics at three universities (Zurich, Cambridge, and UCLA), we examine the composition of these academics’ networks at different times and discuss the role of transnational ties within them. We find that increased mobility does indeed result in more transnational networks, but it does not increase academic social capital. The additional transnational ties mainly consist of transnational kinship and friendship relations. Furthermore, the mobility of early‐career academics triggers various forms of mobility among their family members. Finally, early‐career academics can build transnational academic ties without necessarily becoming mobile themselves, thanks to the mobility of higher‐ranked academics.