Voici les éléments 1 - 4 sur 4
  • Publication
    Accès libre
    From Police Reports to Data Marts: a Step Towards a Crime Analysis Framework
    (: Springer, 2012-11-11) ;
    Nowadays, crime analyses are often conducted with computational methods. These methods, using several different systems (such as decision support systems), need to handle forensic data in a specific way. In this paper we present a methodology to structure police report data for crime analysis. The proposed artifact is mainly about applying data warehousing concepts to forensic data in a crime analysis perspective. Moreover, a proof of concept is carried out with real forensic data to illustrate and evaluate our methodology. These experiments highlight the need of such framework for crime analysis.
  • Publication
    Accès libre
    Crime Linkage: a Fuzzy MCDM Approach
    (: IEEE, 2013-6-4) ; ;
    Grossrieder, Lionel
    ;
    Ribaux, Olivier
    ;
    Grouping crimes having similarities has always been interesting for analysts. Actually, when a set of crimes share common properties, the capability to conduct reasoning and the automation with this set drastically increase. Conjunction, interpretation and explanation based on similarities can be key success factors to apprehend criminals. In this paper, we present a computerized method for high-volume crime linkage, based on a fuzzy MCDM approach in order to combine situational, behavioral, and forensic information. Experiments are conducted with series in burglaries from real data and compared to expert results.
  • Publication
    Accès libre
    The CriLiM Methodology: Crime Linkage with a Fuzzy MCDM Approach
    (: IEEE, 2013-8-12) ; ;
    Grossrieder, Lionel
    ;
    Ribaux, Olivier
    ;
    Grouping events having similarities has always been interesting for analysts. Actually, when a label is put on top of a set of events to denote they share common properties, the automation and the capability to conduct reasoning with this set drastically increase. This is particularly true when considering criminal events for crime analysts; conjunction, interpretation and explanation can be key success factors to apprehend criminals. In this paper, we present the CriLiM methodology for investigating both serious and high-volume crime. Our artifact consists in implementing a tailored computerized crime linkage system, based on a fuzzy MCDM approach in order to combine spatio-temporal, behavioral, and forensic information. As a proof of concept, series in burglaries are examined from real data and compared to expert results.
  • Publication
    Métadonnées seulement
    Change points detection in crime-related time series: An on-line fuzzy approach based on a shape space representation
    (2015-12-17) ;
    Grossrieder, Lionel
    ;
    Ribaux, Olivier
    ;
    The extension of traditional data mining methods to time series has been effectively applied to a wide range of domains such as finance, econometrics, biology, security, and medicine. Many existing mining methods deal with the task of change points detection, but very few provide a flexible approach. Querying specific change points with linguistic variables is particularly useful in crime analysis, where intuitive, understandable, and appropriate detection of changes can significantly improve the allocation of resources for timely and concise operations. In this paper, we propose an on-line method for detecting and querying change points in crime-related time series with the use of a meaningful representation and a fuzzy inference system. Change points detection is based on a shape space representation, and linguistic terms describing geometric properties of the change points are used to express queries, offering the advantage of intuitiveness and flexibility. An empirical evaluation is first conducted on a crime data set to confirm the validity of the proposed method and then on a financial data set to test its general applicability. A comparison to a similar change-point detection algorithm and a sensitivity analysis are also conducted. Results show that the method is able to accurately detect change points at very low computational costs. More broadly, the detection of specific change points within time series of virtually any domain is made more intuitive and more understandable, even for experts not related to data mining.